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Keep Your Ride Shiny With The World's First Mobile Bike-Cleaning Machine

Cleaning your bike is so annoying, most people don't do it. CycleWash makes it easy.

  • <p>CycleWash was invented in and is made in Germany, and it can clean any bike in five minutes using barely more than a pint of water.</p>
  • <p>An on-board tank holds 30 gallons, so the machine can be used away from a main water supply.</p>
  • <p>The machine itself uses spinning brushes, just like a car wash. Water is kept in the machine and recirculated for the duration of the wash.</p>
  • 01 /03

    CycleWash was invented in and is made in Germany, and it can clean any bike in five minutes using barely more than a pint of water.

  • 02 /03

    An on-board tank holds 30 gallons, so the machine can be used away from a main water supply.

  • 03 /03

    The machine itself uses spinning brushes, just like a car wash. Water is kept in the machine and recirculated for the duration of the wash.

Most people already have a bicycle-cleaning machine: It's called the rain. We like having a clean bicycle, sure, but who likes doing the actual cleaning? Jamming a brush up under the bottom bracket? Taking a toothbrush to the chain ring? No thanks.

We're all just too lazy, which is why the CycleWash Duo, also know as the "World's First Mobile Bike-Cleaning Machine," might be a great success.

The machine, which was invented in and is made in Germany, can clean any bike in five minutes, including electric bikes, and it does so using barely more than a pint of water, which it purifies before use. An on-board tank holds 30 gallons, so the machine can be used away from a main water supply. The machine also has a hand-operated spray to prewash the bike's dirtiest crannies, and to rinse it after the machine cycle is done. The machine itself uses spinning brushes, just like a car wash. Water is kept in the machine and recirculated for the duration of the wash.

The uses are legion. A bike shop could park one out front for customers to use, similar to how many will leave an air pump chained up outside. The machine fits in the back of a station wagon, so you could even schlep it out to the wilderness if you go on a mountain biking day-trip, letting everyone go home with a clean bike. Or, as CycleWash's inventor Sachin Kumar suggested to Co.Exist, "Private professionals who own expensive bikes could own such a machine," although at $7,000 a pop, you could pay the neighbor's kid to hand-wash your bikes quite a few times instead.

There's a business opportunity here, too. Not many people will buy a machine for personal use, or even to offer customers. That's why the machine can be used as a commercial washer. Customers scan the QR code using an app, then pay for the wash with PayPal. One can imagine finding one at a gas station, or alongside bike parking. "We have sold two machines this year," says Kumar, "and have been on a road show in different cities in Germany where we cleaned over 3,000 bikes this year."

A clean bike is a happy bike. It works better, it lasts longer, it looks better, and it doesn't dirty your clothes. Given that there are lots of places where it barely rains, this is a much better solution.

[All Photos: via CycleWash]

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