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  • <p>Climate Central says only three of the 135 cities had average temperatures below median levels this summer.</p>
  • <p>In 77 places, temperatures were in the hottest 10% of summers since records began.</p>
  • <p>Cities in the Southwest were particularly warm.</p>
  • <p>Places like Colorado Springs (where 2012 was previously the hottest) set new highs.</p>
  • <p>California, Connecticut, and Rhode Island all had record-breaking summers.</p>
  • <p>Alaska, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania and South Carolina had their second-hottest summers ever too.</p>
  • 01 /06

    Climate Central says only three of the 135 cities had average temperatures below median levels this summer.

  • 02 /06

    In 77 places, temperatures were in the hottest 10% of summers since records began.

  • 03 /06

    Cities in the Southwest were particularly warm.

  • 04 /06

    Places like Colorado Springs (where 2012 was previously the hottest) set new highs.

  • 05 /06

    California, Connecticut, and Rhode Island all had record-breaking summers.

  • 06 /06

    Alaska, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania and South Carolina had their second-hottest summers ever too.

If you live in Cleveland, Savannah, Las Vegas, or Anchorage, the summer you just experienced was the warmest on record (congratulations). That's according to Climate Central, the nonprofit news group, which looked through the records of 135 U.S. cities, grading each place's heat on a curve.

Take a look here. Cities in the Southwest were particularly warm. For example, Phoenix was near its record high (which was last year). Likewise Colorado Springs (2012 was the hottest), and Albuquerque, New Mexico (2011 was the last record) hit new highs.

Climate Central says only three of the 135 cities had average temperatures below median levels and that in 77 places, temperatures were in the hottest 10% of summers since records began.

In fact, much of the country saw exceptionally heat, recent NOAA figures show. California, Connecticut, and Rhode Island all had record-breaking summers. Alaska, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania and South Carolina had their second-hottest summers ever. And eight states in the Northeast had their warmest Augusts on record.

Sure, it's possible these trends are nothing to do with man-made climate change, but it's not likely. NASA says August was the the 11th straight month that temperatures exceeded records, suggesting that something quite unusual is going on in the atmosphere.

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[Cover Photo: mixmotive/iStock]

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