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This video is a joyous schadenfreude-fest. In it, you see a bunch of people, who are racist or xenophobic to varying extents, being interviewed about their biases.

As you can see in the video, from travel site Momondo, they discussed their views of people from other countries. The subjects were also asked to give DNA in order to determine their genetic lineage.

Six of 67 interviewees are featured both here, and in a further series of videos, presumably because their prejudices lined up so neatly with their DNA results. There's a German-hating skinhead from England, a Kurdish woman who says that there's a side of her that "hates Turkish people," and an Icelandic man who tells the interviewer that he is "Strong, and more important than a lot of people." And you probably already guessed that they all had ancestors from their most hated countries or ethnic groups.

The idea of this video series is to promote Momondo's travel business, and to show us that "We actually have much more in common with other nationalities than you’d think," but what what's really extraordinary is that these people were willing to admit their nationalist and racist tendencies on camera (they could, of course, be actors). This, of course, makes the victory that much sweeter, as these folks are so sure that they're superior and correct that they don't care what anyone else thinks.

There is one good point to be made here, though, and that's that if this kind of knowledge about one's origins was more widespread, then perhaps we'd be more likely to see the connections between ourselves, instead of making barriers.

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