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The SkinGun Sprays Wounds With Your Own Skin Stem Cells For Faster Healing

Burns could heal faster without scarring.

  • <p>The SkinGun sprays fluid containing your own stem cells onto wounds, treating things like burns to make them heal faster and without scarring.</p>
  • <p>The gun is more like a plant-mister than a water-pistol, spritzing out a gentle cloud of cell-infused vapor that "achieves 97.3 percent cell viability."</p>
  • <p>Renova Care, the company behind the SkinGun and the CellMist it fires, claims that the coverage is 200 times better than "conventional methods."</p>
  • <p>Right now, the SkinGun is mostly being used as an experimental treatment in Germany, but exploratory work has begun in the U.S too.</p>
  • <p>The stem cells themselves come from the patient and are taken from healthy skin, mixed up into a suspension and transferred into a syringe.</p>
  • <p>Skin is well-suited to stem-cell healing, because it is readily accessible and requires no invasive surgery to apply the cells to the wound.</p>
  • <p>The rapid healing also means that there’s less chance of infection compared to skin grafting, the usual procedure.</p>
  • 01 /07

    The SkinGun sprays fluid containing your own stem cells onto wounds, treating things like burns to make them heal faster and without scarring.

  • 02 /07

    The gun is more like a plant-mister than a water-pistol, spritzing out a gentle cloud of cell-infused vapor that "achieves 97.3 percent cell viability."

  • 03 /07

    Renova Care, the company behind the SkinGun and the CellMist it fires, claims that the coverage is 200 times better than "conventional methods."

  • 04 /07

    Right now, the SkinGun is mostly being used as an experimental treatment in Germany, but exploratory work has begun in the U.S too.

  • 05 /07

    The stem cells themselves come from the patient and are taken from healthy skin, mixed up into a suspension and transferred into a syringe.

  • 06 /07

    Skin is well-suited to stem-cell healing, because it is readily accessible and requires no invasive surgery to apply the cells to the wound.

  • 07 /07

    The rapid healing also means that there’s less chance of infection compared to skin grafting, the usual procedure.

The SkinGun sprays fluid containing your own stem cells onto wounds, treating things like burns to make them heal faster and without scarring. The gun is more like a plant-mister than a water-pistol, spritzing out a gentle cloud of cell-infused vapor that "achieves 97.3% cell viability." That’s important, because if the sprayer kills the cells it puffs out, then you may as well not bother.

RenovaCare, the company behind the SkinGun and the CellMist it fires, claims that the coverage is 200 times better than "conventional methods," although one might argue that little in the relatively new field of stem-cell therapy is conventional and it's not clear to what coverage is being compared.

Right now, the SkinGun is mostly being used as an experimental treatment in Germany, but exploratory work has begun in the U.S too—though the product is not in clinical trials yet and has not received FDA approval.

The stem cells themselves come from the patient and are taken from healthy skin, mixed up into a suspension and transferred into a syringe, which is then loaded into the gun. Skin is well-suited to stem-cell healing, because it is readily accessible and requires no invasive surgery to apply the cells to the wound. The rapid healing also means that there’s less chance of infection compared to skin grafting, the usual procedure.

SkinGun treatments aren’t needed for minor burns. Conversely, third-degree burns leave so little behind that the CellMist doesn’t have anything to work with. The SkinGun, then, aims to be a Goldilocks treatment, working just great on second-degree burns.

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