In Ecovative Design's business model, mushrooms inevitably take over the world.

First, the company rolled out its custom-molded, compostable packaging made out of agricultural crop waste bonded with mycelium, otherwise known as mushroom roots.

Then, it moved into mushroom home building materials--the company even has a mushroom "tiny house" on its property and uses it as a conference room.

This month, Ecovative announced that it's selling “grow it yourself” mushroom materials that can be used to create almost anything your mycelium-loving heart desires.

Projects highlighted on the Ecovative website include a giant mushroom tower and the Mush-Lume lamp.

According to the company, mushroom materials can be used to replace engineered woods and plastic foams, and for educational projects.

Each GIY kit comes with a 10-pound bag of mushroom materials that are renewable and biodegradable.

Once dried, the materials have a density of about 6 to 7 pounds per cubic foot--plenty to create a decently large project.

Just grind up the material, pack it into whatever tooling you're working with, cover it at room temperature for four to six days, tent it in plastic, and dry it out.

And there it is: your very own mushroom product.

2014-08-05

Co.Exist

How To Build A Lamp, Sculpture, Or Even A House Out Of Mushrooms

With this "grow it yourself" kit, including a 10-pound bag of mushroom materials, if you can dream it, you can build it.

In Ecovative Design's business model, mushrooms inevitably take over the world.

First, the company rolled out its custom-molded, compostable packaging made out of agricultural crop waste bonded with mycelium, otherwise known as mushroom roots. Then, it moved into mushroom home building materials—the company even has a mushroom "tiny house" on its property and uses it as a conference room.

This month, Ecovative announced that it's selling “grow it yourself” mushroom materials that can be used to create almost anything your mycelium-loving heart desires. Projects highlighted on the Ecovative website include a giant mushroom tower and the Mush-Lume lamp. According to the company, mushroom materials can be used to replace engineered woods and plastic foams, and for educational projects.

Each GIY kit comes with a 10-pound bag of mushroom materials that are renewable and biodegradable. Once dried, the materials have a density of about six to seven pounds per cubic foot—plenty to create a decently large project.

Just grind up the material, pack it into whatever tooling you're working with, cover it at room temperature for four to six days, tent it in plastic, and dry it out. And there it is: your very own mushroom product.

Looking for a bit more guidance? Ecovative also sells a mushroom house build kit for $9,000.

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1 Comments

  • James Moore

    Very cool. We definitely need more renewable materials. What will be next, houses made of ginger bread?