2014-06-23

Co.Exist

50 Ways To Get A Job You Care About

Make job-hunting for a meaningful job a little less intimidating.

Stuck in a rut while looking for a job with social impact? Sometimes, the best thing you can do is to stop looking and start taking action, no matter how small that action might be. A site called 50 Ways to Get a Job That Makes Good offers actionable steps that jobseekers can take at every point in the process, from when they're first starting out and finding a purpose all the way up to the interview process and beyond.

Created by Dev Aulja, co-author of Making Good and the founder of Catalog, an advisory and recruiting outfit for social enterprises, the site leverages an appealing, simple design to make job-hunting seem a little less intimidating.

Say you're in the "networking" stage of a job-hunting process. The site offers six different steps you can take, like creating a list of 20 people who are rethinking your industry, mapping a network, and finding a future boss. Clicking on any of those steps yields more detail. Here's what the site suggests if you want to create that list of 20 people:

Once a step is completed, you can either mark that you've done it or request a reminder for some point in the future.

Within the first five days that the site was live, 150,000 people visited. Aulja already has seen a number of success stories. "I spend all day placing people in these companies, hearing from the company side why they can’t find people, hearing on the candidate side why they cant find a job," he says. "If you follow the website, you’re going to meet 20-plus people, and get real skills. If you just talk to that many people, something’s got to shift."

Check out the site, funded by the Ontario Trillium Foundation’s Future Fund, to find your own job-seeking path.

[Image: Abstract via Shutterstock]

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2 Comments

  • Glenda Doyle Heidsick

    How do you expect to find a job when you use grammar as awful as the graphic title shown above?? That is the first problem to solve, learn to speak English correctly. Referring to: "Where are you at in your job search?"

  • frisbee

    The graphic seems grammatically correct to me. The phrase "I am" is implied in each box.