Women at Google are only 30% of the global workforce, as this Google Doodle shows.

Minorities have it worse, with black and hispanics together making up only 5% of the entire U.S. team, whereas they are about 28% of the U.S. workforce overall.

Here is the graphic from Google's diversity report that shows the overall company figures.

It's even less diverse when you just look at Google's tech workforce.

The statistics for non-tech roles are shown here, where women do make up almost half of the workforce but minorities are still behind.

And finally, the leadership team could also use way more diversity across the company.

2014-05-30

Visualizing Google’s Workforce Diversity With . . . A Google Doodle

The company's first workforce diversity report is a groundbreaking step for the tech industry, but the statistics themselves are dismaying.

With its homepage Doodles, Google is great at raising the profile of a great diversity of influential female and minority figures in society. (Recent doodles include conservationist Rachel Carson, paleontologist Mary Anning, and civil rights activist Dorothy Height.)

So it’s nice and fitting that software designer and developer Matt Stempeck went ahead and mocked up two very simple Google Doodles to visualize the statistics coming from the company’s groundbreaking diversity report that it released this week.

Gender diversity Google Doodle: 70% men, 30% women. Credit: Matt Stempeck

While Google is being widely lauded for publicly owning up to its diversity challenges (it is the first major tech company to do so), the stats themselves are dismaying. Women at Google comprise only 30% of the global workforce, 21% of leadership roles, and 17% of tech roles. Minorities have it worse, with black and Hispanics together making up only 5% of the entire U.S. team, whereas they are about 28% of the U.S. workforce overall.

Racial diversity Google Doodle: 61% white, 34% asian, 2% black, 3% hispanic, 3% mixed race, <1% other. Credit: Matt Stempeck

Still, as Google employee Anthea Watson Strong wrote on her blog, transparency is the first step to changing this situation. Now, especially if Google continues to make these numbers public every year, outsiders can hold executives accountable to their claims that increasing diversity is an important priority to the company. If other tech companies would now follow Google’s example, there will be real motivation to actually improve the representation of women and minorities in the tech field overall.

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