The Ville Savoy is a sprawling, fluid home, inspired by microcellular systems and biogenetics.

It's designed to be made from concrete and 3-D printed panels and frames.

The modular system could be adapted for any particular site to match the land’s specific topography.

In these renderings, Vaíllo imagined a version sitting between two classic midcentury homes designed by Richard Neutra.

The house is made of three main sections. On the outer walls, panels open and close like gills to let in light and air.

Even as architectural styles have evolved, the typical form of a home has stayed more or less the same.

The designer, Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez, wanted to challenge conventional expectations for what houses of the near future could be.

Keep scrolling for more views of the house.

Keep scrolling for more views of the house.

Keep scrolling for more views of the house.

Keep scrolling for more views of the house.

Keep scrolling for more views of the house.

Keep scrolling for more views of the house.

Keep scrolling for more views of the house.

2014-04-04

This Crazy Liquid Blob Is Actually The House Of The Future

The Ville Savoye is inspired by microcellular systems. Is it the model for how we'll all live?

Think of a generic house, and you probably picture something along the lines of a simple children’s drawing: A basic box with a few windows and a door. Even as architectural styles have evolved, the typical form of a home has stayed more or less the same. That’s why, at first glance, it’s hard to tell that this new design from postgraduate architecture student Gonzalo Vaíllo Martínez is a house at all.

The designer wanted to challenge conventional expectations for houses of the near future. “We still have many restrictions imposed by Modernism,” Vaíllo says. “They are embedded in society, even if they are outdated. If you show a picture of the Ville Savoye to somebody who has nothing to do with architecture, he or she will probably still tell you it is an avant-garde house. A house from 1931.”

Vaíllo’s sprawling, fluid home, inspired by microcellular systems and biogenetics, is designed to be made from concrete and 3-D printed panels and frames. The modular system could be adapted for any particular site to match the land’s specific topography; in these renderings, Vaíllo imagined a version sitting between two classic midcentury homes designed by Richard Neutra.

The house is made of three main sections. On the outer walls, panels open and close like gills to let in light and air. The crazy shape of the structure is created using 3-D modeling. As the video below shows, the digital tool animates the frame of the house so it can evolve into new forms.

Though Vaíllo says the house would be possible to build, it wouldn't be easy. "Every single corner would be a challenge," he says. "Although the house takes into account the constructive logics of common building, there isn’t any single piece in the market that can be directly used in the house." The technology needed for this type of construction exists, but tends to be in use by other disciplines, Vaillo explains. "If we use these resources with an architectural purpose, we will be able to uplift the possibilities of what we understand as architecture."

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18 Comments

  • Tho personal taste may differ (I personally don't like this TODAY) I'm amazed by how critical the comments here are. Don't people want to be challenged? I KNOW that my taste is purely cultural and it will change over the years. Unreflective people will always hate new things but we will take the best from new wild projects and culture will slowly keep changing.

    Imagine how boring life would be If all change and all provocation was incremental? I don't want to live in this now but I love what the project made me feel and realize.

  • Matthew Hunt

    that house looks like a living nightmare. 3D printed houses are awesome, but this looks like it's going to eat you, or lay it's young inside you.

  • Pookie Snooples

    Are we sure this guy didn't leave the room with his 3D modeling software open.. Not realizing he spilled a jar of Catnip on his keyboard??

  • Pookie Snooples

    This designer' should lay off the hallucinogens and come back down to earth. This looks like a twisted version of the crashed ship in the movie Aliens.. Claiming this is "actually the house of the future" is a bit of a stretch guys..

  • Lance Eldert

    Impractical? Unattractive? How easy is it to modify or repair? And from my experience, if the mind cannot sense order of some kind or feels perpetually in flux, depression and anxiety aren't far behind. Home sweet home? Nope. Aesthetically it resembles a dying or dead carcass.

  • I don't get it... like at all. Why would anyone want this, or want to build this, or even want to look at this? It looks like a pile of trash between two nice homes, or like a big dead fish.

  • It's interesting, but I would not want a home that would frighten the mess out of me every time I came home. It looks like it's waiting to devour something. The neighborhood dogs would form a howling collective, and try to defeat it. There would be hissing noises in the trees. We've only seen depictions in the daytime; how would it look at night? G. V. Martinez must definitely be inspired by Hans Rudolf (H. R.) Giger.

  • This 'biodegraded aesthetic' challenges ( putting it culturally and psychologically correctly) not just the definition of "house". It can be an environmental organic bio processor that can do much more than harmonize systems that function the way the human complex does. Like the analog of the canopy of tall trees is to Gothic Churches this metaphor must also push the envelope to become a habitable sustainable energy generator that provides it inhabitants with the support needed for healing, growth and development. If it does not do this, in my opinion, it would be another form for form sake adventure of the many we have seen that do not deliver the total sustainable experience people need.

  • How is this house superior? Is it easier to heat, cool, ventilate, plumb, light, secure, clean, or maintain? Doubtful. Build one and we'll take an interest. Until then it's just fantasy.

  • Markus Pope

    Come on! My wife and I are too busy to clean the boring home we have now! Who is going to maintain these things. Cool art though!

  • Yeah, thats EXACTLY what the future needs. Hard-to-construct houses that inefficiently use space and are even more expensive and gaudy than the crap we build today.