These drone chalkings mimic murder scene investigations.

They are meant to dramatize the reality and lack of disclosure around drone warfare.

With his project, called Drone Shadows, British artist James Bridle has been chalking outlines on city streets.

He started with London, and has now complete drawings in Istanbul, Brighton, Washington D.C., Brisbane, Australia, Sao Paolo.

"In order to understand the world around us, we sometimes need to draw it out," he says.

"If you can’t really describe the world around you, you can’t fully act in it, and are made powerless. When you can describe it, you can debate and critique it."

"Drawing its shadow is just the first step."

To encourage others to follow his lead, he's created a detailed Drone Shadow Handbook, with instructions about making your own markings.

Helpfully, it covers several well-known drone types (Predator, Hawk, Reaper), providing dimensions for each.

"Drone Shadows should be 1:1 representations: they should be the exact dimensions of real drones, according to the measurements in the schematics here or ones you create yourself," he says.

They look like the marking for murder victims, which part of the point.

2014-02-12

Co.Exist

These Street Art Chalk Outlines Of Drones Are Appearing Around The World

Mimicking murder scene investigations, these chalkings are one artist's attempt to provoke discussion about UAVs and bring a hidden war into the open.

The drone war takes place in the shadows. As citizens, we have little idea of what killing is going on in our name, though recent leaks help paint a picture.

To dramatize both the reality and the lack of disclosure, British artist James Bridle has been chalking outlines on city street with his project Drone Shadows. The work looks like the markings for murder victims—which is part of the point—though they depict the overflying aerial vehicles.

Bridle drew the first outline in London in early 2012, and has since followed up with further drawings in Istanbul, Brighton, Washington D.C., Brisbane, Australia, Sao Paolo, Detroit and elsewhere. "In order to understand the world around us, we sometimes need to draw it out," he says. "If you can’t really describe the world around you, you can’t fully act in it, and are made powerless. When you can describe it, you can debate and critique it. Drawing its shadow is just the first step."

To encourage others to follow his lead, he's created a detailed Drone Shadow Handbook, with instructions about making your own markings. Helpfully, it covers several well-known drone types (Predator, Hawk, Reaper), providing dimensions for each. "Drone Shadows should be 1:1 representations: they should be the exact dimensions of real drones, according to the measurements in the schematics here or ones you create yourself," he says.

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