At the height of Cold War paranoia, when Americans were contemplating bomb shelters and other survival plans for a potential Soviet strike, one uber-rich Las Vegas businessman decided to get a bit next level.

Rather than flee underground when the bomb came, Girard B. Henderson and wife would live there all the time.

Now, his 1978 estate--comprising two underground houses and an above-ground house plus a garage and an acre of land--are all for sale for $1.7 million.

The home includes lavish wallpaper, a 360-degree mural, a putting green, lighted display cases and a large kitchen with built-in sound and a toaster built into the wall, according to the Las Vegas Review Journal.

The house even includes an underground yard that surrounds it on all four sides.

Apparently Henderson was an activist for subterranean lifestyles.

He had already built another underground home in Boulder, Colorado, by the time he erected the Vegas one, and at the World's Fair in 1965, he sponsored an event called "Why Live Underground."

In addition to the added safety in case of nuclear meltdown, another possible benefit: air conditioning costs should be kept to a minimum with fewer windows allowing in the scorching, desert sun.

Real estate agents may have to borrow some of that marketing creativity to get the property off their hands--in 2001, it was listed for $8 million.

Real estate agents may have to borrow some of that marketing creativity to get the property off their hands--in 2001, it was listed for $8 million.

2013-09-12

You Can Buy This Underground Las Vegas Bomb Shelter Shaped Like A House With A Yard

Rather than make contingency plans to flee to a nuclear shelter, a rich Las Vegas businessman decided to simply live underground in the case of an attack. Now his property is up for sale.

At the height of Cold War paranoia, when Americans were contemplating bomb shelters and other survival plans for a potential Soviet strike, one uber-rich Las Vegas businessman decided to get a bit next level.

Rather than flee underground when the bomb came, Girard B. Henderson and wife would live there all the time.

Now, his 1978 estate—comprising two underground houses and an above-ground house plus a garage and an acre of land—are all for sale for $1.7 million.

According to the Las Vegas Review-Journal:

The home includes lavish wallpaper, a 360-degree mural, a putting green, lighted display cases and a large kitchen with built-in sound and a toaster built into the wall. The house even includes an underground yard that surrounds it on all four sides.

Apparently Henderson was an activist for subterranean lifestyles. He had already built another underground home in Boulder, Colorado, by the time he erected the Vegas one, and at the World's Fair in 1965, he sponsored an event called "Why Live Underground."

In addition to the added safety in case of nuclear meltdown or attack, another possible benefit: air conditioning costs should be kept to a minimum with fewer windows allowing in the scorching, desert sun. In today's unreliable housing market, real estate agents may have to borrow some of his marketing creativity to get the property off their hands—in 2001, it was listed for $8 million.

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