2013-09-03

Co.Exist

The Best Businesses For Workers, And The Perks They Offer

B Lab, which certifies socially responsible companies, shares its annual list of the firms where anyone would love to work.

Every year, B Lab--the Pennsylviania organization behind the quickly growing B Corp certification program--releases a list of the best businesses for the world, based on how well they score in B Lab's impact assessment tool. Only the top 10% of businesses that qualify for B Corp certification are chosen.

Since 2007, companies that want to make money and still do good in the world have had the opportunity to become Certified B Corporations, a status that indicates they have met a rigorous set of standards laid out by B Lab.

The assessment examines performance in three main categories: environment, workers, and community. In the last few week, B Lab has been releasing individual lists of the top performers in each category, and this week comes the 79 companies that made the "Best for the Workers List." (All listed also meet B Corp's basic environmental and community standards.) Below are some of the top scorers:

Small Businesses

Abacus

At this wealth management and investment advice firm, located in Pennsylvania, more than 75% of employees take time off for community service, more than 50% of employees are women, everyone on staff is reimbursed for continuing education, and more than 6% of the firm's net profits are put into a profit-sharing plan.

Audacious Inquiry

Full-time employees own more than 50% of this Maryland technology consulting firm. More than 6% of employees are reimbursed for full-time education.

Trillium Asset Management

A Massachusetts investment advising firm dedicated to sustainable investments, Trillium offers 15% of its net profits in an employee profit-sharing plan, has more than 50% female employees, and pays all employees a living wage.

Midsize businesses

3Degrees

An environmental consulting firm in California, 3Degrees gives more than 75% of its employees stock options, offers "socially and environmentally focused" 401(k) investments, and covers more than 80% of health premiums. The company also provides plenty of flex-time and commuting options.

Dansko

This popular Pennsylvania-based shoe company gives tuition reimbursement to all employees, is majority-owned by employees, and shares more than 5% of its profits with employees. It also pays employees to volunteer--and then goes the extra mile and matches their salary in donations.

King Arthur Flour

An employee-owned Vermont flour company, King Arthur gives employees 40 hours of paid time off for volunteering, pays more than 80% of health care premiums, offers a living wage to full- and part-time employees, and has a staff of over 50% women.

Micro-Enterprises

A&R Solar
A&R, a solar photovoltaic and solar hot water system company in Washington, pays all employees more than 55% above living wage, covers more than 80% of health premiums, and has a fully funded retirement plan for anyone who has been working there for more than two years.

Beartooth Capital

This Montana-based investment firm, which buys and sells ranch properties in the Western U.S., has a matched employee retirement plan and has protected more than 11,000 acres of land while creating three new parks.

Sequil

Sequil, a sustainable architecture and design planning firm in Florida, is entirely employee-owned, pays all health care premiums, and gives unlimited paid time off. More than 75% of staff are certified in LEED's green building program, and 30% of the firm's projects are for low-income housing.

Check out B Lab's full list here.

[Image: Abstract via Shutterstock]

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4 Comments

  • Amit Chauhan

    This is nice .... Companies offer these amazing perks but not many people know about it. 
    www.recroup.com/perks is first perk board where companies can show off their perks and talent can get a better pitcure inside the company culture.

  • Cari Turley

    What about employee engagement scores? Are those factored in? High salaries and equal gender splits aren't always enough to keep workers happy. I'm curious if any employee surveys were used to determine the rankings.

  • Bryan Dowdy

    I'm seeing a something funny here... using employee gender percentages as a scoring criteria can create a significant bias.  Now if you were to use a comparison of male vs. female salaries, that would be more indicative of impartial treatment.