Nike has been interested in trash for a while now. Back in 2008, it made some nice looking basketball shoes from scraps of foam and synthetic leather.

Nike's latest foray to the landfill has now produced not a new product, but a new store design in Shanghai.

Developed by Taiwanese design firm Miniwiz, it's literally 100% trash: "5,500 soda cans, 2,000 PET water bottles and 50,000 old CDs and DVDs."

The highlight of the store is an adjustable "suspension ceiling system" made from recycled DVDs and reinforced with rice husks.

Its metal piping comes from 5,278 aluminum cans.

And there's not a spot of glue in the whole thing. All the joints are mechanical, so the system can be deconstructed and recycled when necessary.

2013-09-04

Co.Exist

This New Nike Store Is Built Entirely From Trash

The shoe giant has been involved in recycling projects before, but this concept store in China—made 100% from soda cans, old CDs, and other garbage—may take the cake.

Nike has been interested in trash for a while now. Back in 2008, it made some nice looking basketball shoes from scraps of foam and synthetic leather. It called them Trash Talk. More recently, it released a database that helps designers understand the impacts of various materials. A representative said Nike was interested in inventing products that could be "infinitely recycled."

Nike's latest foray to the landfill has now produced not a new product, but a new store design in Shanghai. Developed by Taiwanese design firm Miniwiz, it's literally 100% trash: "5,500 soda cans, 2,000 PET water bottles and 50,000 old CDs and DVDs." Thankfully, it doesn't really look trashy at all.

The highlight of the store is an adjustable "suspension ceiling system" made from recycled DVDs and reinforced with rice husks. Its metal piping comes from 5,278 aluminum cans. And there's not a spot of glue in the whole thing. All the joints are mechanical, so the system can be deconstructed and recycled when necessary.

Miniwiz is famous for the EcoARK, a building made largely from plastic bottles. The three-story temporary structure weighed 50% less than a conventional building and yet could withstand earthquakes and fires, according to the firm. After that, you would think a concept shoe store was pretty easy.

[Image: TonyV3112 via Shutterstock]

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