Feed's Lauren Bush Lauren On Why She Became A Social Entrepreneur

Inside the growing tote bag and apparel business that feeds the hungry with each purchase.

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Lauren Bush Lauren says that she's been influenced by her family's interest in public service. That's because the Bush in her name is the Bush family (the second Lauren is from her husband, Ralph Lauren scion David Lauren). But instead of taking the route that led her uncle and grandfather to the White House, Lauren became a social entrepreneur.

The company she started, Feed, sells tote bags and other apparel and then gives the money to help fund school lunches in the developing world, often the only meal they'll eat a day. Available in places like Target and Whole Foods, the bags have taken off, as more and more people look to tie their purchases to meaningful action. As Lauren says about the genesis of the business model: "Why not build in the cost to feed a child in school for a year into a single bag and allow people to participate."

"When I started Feed," she says, "I hadn't even heard of the term social entrepreneur. Now it's the cool hip buzzword. It's part of our generation's ethos to want to pursue our passions, pursue business, pursue entrepreneurship, but also do it with the world in mind."

[Image: Lauren Bush, Debby Wong via Shutterstock]

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Feed's Lauren Bush Lauren On Why She Became A Social Entrepreneur

Inside the growing tote bag and apparel business that feeds the hungry with each purchase.

Lauren Bush Lauren says that she's been influenced by her family's interest in public service. That's because the Bush in her name is the Bush family (the second Lauren is from her husband, Ralph Lauren scion David Lauren). But instead of taking the route that led her uncle and grandfather to the White House, Lauren became a social entrepreneur.

The company she started, Feed, sells tote bags and other apparel and then gives the money to help fund school lunches in the developing world, often the only meal they'll eat a day. Available in places like Target and Whole Foods, the bags have taken off, as more and more people look to tie their purchases to meaningful action. As Lauren says about the genesis of the business model: "Why not build in the cost to feed a child in school for a year into a single bag and allow people to participate."

"When I started Feed," she says, "I hadn't even heard of the term social entrepreneur. Now it's the cool hip buzzword. It's part of our generation's ethos to want to pursue our passions, pursue business, pursue entrepreneurship, but also do it with the world in mind."

[Image: Lauren Bush, Debby Wong via Shutterstock]