The problem of cultural fit is a big one: these days, one out of two people won’t last more than 18 months at their job, mainly due to a mismatched cultural fit.

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Good.Co is, according to co-founder Samar Birwadke, "a big data approach to solving a painful, recurrent HR problem."

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Today, the platform features six different sections: the Strengths Canvas (individual personality evaluation), the Company Canvas (a survey that looks at how well you fit in with your managers and company), the Fitscore With Peers (compare and match up your results to friends and colleagues), the Team Report (discover your work team’s personality), the Company Graph (find companies and teams that match your personal work style), and Job Matches.

The company’s first enterprise product, expected to roll out in a few months, will help customers identify their cultural footprint, assess incoming talent based on skills and personality, and attract talent that’s looking for certain kinds of workplaces.

The platform has had 18,000 sign-ups since launching beta, with adoption from employees and companies across the U.S.

2013-07-23

Co.Exist

How To Find Out Whether You're A Good Cultural Fit At Any Company

Want a work environment that makes you happy? Want employees that are happy to work for you? Good.Co is taking the guess work out of the hiring process by measuring exactly how we like to work.

I am a humanitarian, a strategist, and a rock. I thrive on stress, I’m good with deadlines, I’m big on communication, and I’m great at multitasking. These traits happen to make me a good fit at Fast Company, which is innovative, competitive, flexible, and ideological (at least according to my perceptions). So say the surveys on Good.Co, a new platform currently in semi-private beta that uses proven psychometric frameworks to help employers efficiently recognize people who would thrive in their unique environments--and on the flip side, to assist jobseekers and teams inside companies to figure out where they fit in the cultural landscape.

Living in the San Francisco Bay Area, it often seems like companies are engaged in a never-ending war to project the most Google-like culture to potential hires. But that’s the wrong way to go about things--not everyone works the best in that kind of environment. In fact, some people are actually best-suited to traditional button-down corporate cultures that they mistakenly believe they loathe.

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The problem of cultural fit is a big one: these days, one out of two people won’t last more than 18 months at their job, mainly due to a mismatched cultural fit. Good.Co is, according to co-founder Samar Birwadker, "a big data approach to solving a painful, recurrent HR problem."

The platform emerged from Birwadker’s own experience working at a company that didn’t have the right culture for him. "It was a great organization, but it wasn’t for me," he says. One of Birwadke’s cofounders, Dr. Kerry Schofield, is an organizational psychologist who studies how people thrive in different environments. With her help, Good.Co came up with a series of quizzes for users--rejiggered, updated versions of the Big Five dimensions of personality.

Today, the platform features six different sections: the Strengths Canvas (individual personality evaluation), the Company Canvas (a survey that looks at how well you fit in with your managers and company), the Fitscore With Peers (compare and match up your results to friends and colleagues), the Team Report (discover your work team’s personality), the Company Graph (find companies and teams that match your personal work style), and Job Matches.

The Team Report requires, of course, that your colleagues all sign up and complete the Strengths Canvas. "Once you invite five, seven people to the team, you identify the team’s archetype," says Birwadker. "We’re already getting a lot of action within organizations." Examples of organization archetypes are below.

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Good.Co’s current platform is just the beginning. The company’s first enterprise product, expected to roll out in a few months, will help customers identify their cultural footprint, assess incoming talent based on skills and personality, and attract talent that’s looking for certain kinds of workplaces. "

The data assets have huge implications in how organizations can create more efficient, optimal cultures suited to the people who work there," says Birwadker. Perhaps if Yahoo had access to the enterprise product before scrapping its telecommuting policy, for example, the company could have had more insight into which teams need in-office time and which could flourish working from home.

The platform has had 18,000 sign-ups since launching beta, with adoption from employees and companies across the U.S. "We haven’t done any detailed analytics around users," says Birwadker. "But coming down the road, we have tons of people from companies like Apple, Yahoo, Microsoft, and Facebook, and [we can look at] how attitudes of Microsoft employees differ from Apple." He emphasizes that those reports would be private; users choose what information they want to make public.

This isn’t a replacement for LinkedIn. In fact, you have to connect to LinkedIn in order to look at job matches. But, says Birwadker, "we feel like we can add a lot of richness and humanize skills down to abstract levels that haven’t been quantified." And just in case you feel like Good.Co hasn’t humanized you correctly, there’s always the opportunity to retake its assessments.

Want to check out Good.Co for yourself? Use the access code Goodcofast to gain instant entry.