Deborah Bay’s photographs show the aftermath of a collision between bullet and bullet-proof glass.

She describes the "psychological tension" between the "jewel-like beauty" of the images, and the "inherent destructiveness of the fragmented projectiles in the plexiglas."

Bay doesn’t want to talk about her own views on gun control; that’s up to the viewer.

And these bullets were all fired by public safety officers.

But she does want you to think about "the impact any of these bullets would have on muscle and bone."

2013-07-01

Co.Exist

These Strangely Beautiful Pictures Show What Happens When Bullets Hit Things

Gunfire can be horrific and violent. But as photographer Deborah Bay demonstrates, its after-effects can also be art--as long as no one gets hurt.

They may look like constellations in space, but these pictures actually show something closer to home: the after-effects of gunfire. Unlike the horror of the Sandy Hook and Aurora shootings, though, the images have a certain beauty about them--the randomness of intense energy barreling through plexiglass.

Photographer Deborah Bay calls the series "The Big Bang.” She says she became interested in guns after seeing a sales display of bullet-proof glass with several heavy rounds in it. "I was particularly interested in how the transparent plastic captured the fragmentation of the bullets and provided a dramatic way of seeing ballistic power outside the usual frame of reference," she says.

She describes the "psychological tension" between the "jewel-like beauty" of the images, and the "inherent destructiveness of the fragmented projectiles in the plexiglas."

Bay doesn’t want to detail her own gun control views: "I think it’s up to the viewer to interpret the work," she says. But the photographer does ask us to "realize the impact any of these bullets would have on muscle and bone," and to appreciate how pervasive guns have become in America. In her home state of Texas, she notes there are an estimated 51 million guns--two for every man, woman and child.

The bullets pictured here were fired peacefully--at a Public Safety Institute at Houston Community College--by law enforcement professionals. Bay took the actual photos back at her studio later.

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9 Comments

  • Vitsing

    Damage is not too different from our own Revolutionary and Civil Wars. Today we use Smaller Calibers and Higher Velocities that do the same or more damage.

    I guess you are aware that our Government and Police use Hollow Point Bullets that result in less Collateral Damage to Innocent Bystanders by disintegrating as they pass through the body. Of course a by product of Hollow Points is that they cause significantly more muscle and bone damage, than the regular bullets used at ranges.

    Military 7.62 and 5.52 rounds are not Hollow Points; however, they can ruin your day if you are on the receiving end. Personally I prefer a pump12 gauge shotgun with 00 buck for close in defense.

  • JMorcan

    Lots of folks also use hollow points for home defense rounds. That protects the homeowner AND the neighbors.

  • Vitsing

    Agree, I also have XDM 40 S&W which is loaded with .40 ACP Hollow Points, for home defense.

  • Davi Braga da Rocha

    Well, if I fire a bullet, I expect that the bullet stop the criminal.

    Sorry about muscle and bones.

  • 2A supporter

    Uh, so what makes you judge over Mr. Rocha?

    How would YOU handle the criminal that's just about to beat YOUR brains in? Talk him out of it? o.O