This is the proposed design for a timber-framed apartment tower, submitted to the Swedish building society HSB Stockholm’s competition for residences of the future.

It was designed by architect C.F. Møller.

The architects point out benefits to wood construction, including: lack of waste products, its surprisingly high resistance to fire, and the great acoustics.

It also has an ability to regulate the inside temperature, and--who doesn’t love exposed wood?--you don’t need to plaster the interiors.

The tower would use solid wood pillars, beams, ceiling frames and window frames, which passersby would be able to see through the building’s transparent facade. But, slightly cheating, a concrete core would provide additional support.

2013-06-28

This 34-Story Skyscraper Would Be The Tallest Wood Building In The World

This proposed Swedish tower would show that not all our buildings have to be built from metal and glass.

It’s no longer just cabins that can be built from logs. In Canada, they’re gearing up for the opening of the North America’s tallest wood building—with six mighty floors. In London, a wood tower stretches to reach floor nine. But in Sweden, the architecture firm C.F. Møller hopes to really raise the stakes with its plans for a 34-floor timber-framed apartment tower, submitted to the Swedish building society HSB Stockholm’s competition for residences of the future.

Why build with wood? According to Dezeen, wood construction can be "cheaper, easier and more sustainable than typical steel and concrete constructions." In a statement, the architects point out other benefits to wood construction, including the lack of waste products, its surprisingly high resistance to fire, the great acoustics, the ability to regulate the inside temperature, and the reduced need for covering in plaster (because who doesn’t love exposed wood?).

The tower would use solid wood pillars, beams, ceiling frames and window frames, which passersby would be able to see through the building’s transparent facade. A concrete core would provide additional support.

Ola Jonsson, an architect at C.F. Møller, explains to Dezeen some of the environmental benefits of working with wood: "Construction accounts for around 30-40 percent of CO2 produced in the world globally and if you look at the CO2 released in the production of wood it is a lot better than steel or concrete." Additional environmentally friendly features would include solar panels on the roof and a communal winter garden.

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3 Comments

  • JFS

    I believe heavy timbers (as opposed to studs) are quite fire resistant. In addition, they are more aesthetically pleasing than either steel or concrete. Their effort requires applause for innovation. Cheers!

  • Spatula El Vatnos

    If you really think the risk of fire isn't seriously much higher than a steel structure... I've got a wooden bridge to sell you.

  • RLR

    This looks like a disaster waiting to happen.  Fire Resistance - Wood?  Only heavy timber.  Nominal dressed lumber is highly combustible - and this rendering makes the structure look like a tinder-box