The French design firm Sitbon has designed an underwater aquatic pod called Bloom.

It’s "a semi-submersible center, moored to the seabed with a system of cables" that would both house researchers and grow carbon-dioxide absorbing phytoplankton.

Their goal is to install them in the Indian Ocean as part of an attempt to monitor tsunamis and absorb carbon dioxide.

The creators write: "Bloom wishes to be a sustainable answer for rising waters by decreasing our carbon footprint while learning to live in accordance with our seas."

"Every factory would have its own bloom allowing it to absorb the CO2 that it created."

"Every factory would have its own bloom allowing it to absorb the CO2 that it created."

"Every factory would have its own bloom allowing it to absorb the CO2 that it created."

2013-05-02

Co.Exist

This Underwater Bubble Will Grow Climate-Saving Algae

The Bloom, an aquatic research station, will also help create carbon-dioxide eating phytoplankton. And provide some seriously nice coastal property.

How will architecture respond to a world of rising ocean tides, shrinking coast lines, changing climates, and extreme weather events? It’s a huge question, one that will define the work of a coming age of designers.

And so far, some designers have already been attempting to answer it, with an eclectic mix of hurricane-proof beach structures, a pollution-eating hospital, and plenty of skyscrapers coated with farms and trees (for better or worse).

The French design firm Sitbon probes the question from the following angle: what to do with all that water? Their answer: an aquatic pod called Bloom. It’s "a semi-submersible center, moored to the seabed with a system of cables" that would both house researchers and grow carbon-dioxide absorbing phytoplankton. While it’s more of an experiment than a vision for what housing looks like in the future, their goal is to install them in the Indian Ocean as part of an attempt to monitor tsunamis and absorb carbon dioxide.

The creators write: "Bloom wishes to be a sustainable answer for rising waters by decreasing our carbon footprint while learning to live in accordance with our seas. Every factory would have its own bloom allowing it to absorb the CO2 that it created."

And if the environmental mission doesn’t go over with investors, maybe the design can be repurposed as a beach house.

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3 Comments

  • Berlin4home

    Sorry but I still think Nature does plankton production and life cycles in the biosphere of the ocean far more efficiently than any designed manmade system could

  • RagnarDanneskjöld

    If they can take the algae and process them into hydrocarbons like Exxon is doing, voila...cheap algae fuel!

  • Sunho Lee

    or grow a food kind of algae...  in fact, various kinds of algae have lots of uses...kelp is an algae that is used in countless products, for example.  algae has shown promise in cleaning up toxic waste too.  all kinds of possibilities exist.