Dutch designer Dean Moran created this concept hotel that includes a market, restaurant, rooftop garden, mini-greenhouses, and several other food-related elements.

It won the top prize in a hotel design competition held by Tablet magazine.

Moran imagines the hotel in downtown New York City, with guests, food sellers, and locals sharing common spaces, like the lobby and courtyard.

Moran sees guests buying food in the market, and supplementing meals in the restaurant, or taking lessons in the open-kitchen teaching area, doing a bit of gardening on the rooftop, or venturing out on food tours around Manhattan.

2013-03-21

Co.Exist

This Beautiful Hotel Is Filled With Farmers Markets And Local Food

Sadly, it’s just a concept. But this award-winning hotel design would pair travel with a robust introduction to local cuisines and farming.

This concept hotel is built around "the underlying principle of local food": selling it, eating it, growing it, learning about it. Visualized by Netherlands-based designer Dean Moran, it includes a market, restaurant, rooftop garden, mini-greenhouses, and several other food-related elements. It won top prize in a recent competition from Tablet, a hotel magazine.

Moran imagines the hotel in downtown New York City, with guests, food sellers, and locals sharing common spaces, like the lobby and courtyard. Food is a way to get people talking. "For me it wasn’t so much a question of 'what can I think of to make an interesting hotel’, but more 'what would be an interesting theme to bring tourists and New Yorkers, or people in general, together’," he says, in an email.

Moran sees guests buying food in the market, and supplementing meals in the restaurant, or taking lessons in the open-kitchen teaching area, doing a bit of gardening on the rooftop, or venturing out on food tours around Manhattan. But he says the concept is more than "just another themed boutique hotel." It is "tweaking what a hotel already has and focusing it towards a food theme."

The magical lighting isn’t completely imaginary. It comes from the twice-yearly "Manhattanhenge": when the setting sun aligns with the street grid, giving everything a particularly golden glow. The "courtyard is shaped to catch as much daylight as possible for the projected location," Moran adds, to provide additional lighting, and ventilation, for rooms coming off it.

Asked when we’re going to see the hotel in the flesh, he replies: "Who knows? At the moment there are no concrete plans to build it, so if any of your readers are interested …"

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