Designed by Janjaap Ruijssenaars, the Landscape House will be an inhabitable version of the Möbius Strip.

The house is going to be built using the D-Shape, a new 3-D printer that can handle large tasks--like a house.

The house is expected to take about 18 months, and somewhere in the range of $5 to $6 million, to finish.

The printer will extrude hollow shells, made from a combination of sand and bonding agent, that, when mixed together, resemble marble. Part of the installation will include reinforcing the shells with concrete and fiberglass.

Ruijssenaars says he’d eventually like to reprint a copy of the building for every country.

2013-01-28

The Floor Turns Into The Ceiling In This 3-D Printed Möbius Strip House

Try not to get too confused as you peruse the model for the Landscape House, a swirling dwelling based on the classic geometric oddity.

It’s not enough that architect Janjaap Ruijssenaars’s Landscape House will be an inhabitable Möbius strip--in which floor turns into ceiling which turns into floor again, in an infinite loop. He’ll build it using a 3-D printer, which would make the home the world’s first 3-D printed building.

"In traditional construction you have to make a mold of wood and you fill it with concrete and then you take out the wood--it’s a waste of time and energy," Ruijssenaars told the BBC. With 3-D priniting, "You can print what you want--it’s a more direct way of constructing."

The house is expected to take about 18 months, and somewhere in the range of $5 to $6 million, to finish. Since rebuilding a duplicate model is almost as simple as pressing "print" again, Ruijssenaars says he’d eventually like to reprint a copy of the building for every country. The D-Shape, used to print the building’s sections will turn out hollow shells, made from a combination of sand and bonding agent, that, when mixed together, resemble marble. Part of the installation will include reinforcing the shells with concrete and fiberglass.

Enrico Dini, the D-Shape’s inventor, told the Guardian that his device allows an unprecedented level of precision when it comes to realizing architectural renderings: "The human limitations of master builders and bricklayers will no longer hamper architects’ visions."

Dini and Ruijssenaars talk a big game. It’ll be interesting to see how the project turns out next year.

Add New Comment

1 Comments