The Citi.Transmitter is a two-wheeled, single seat electric vehicle.

The main unit contains the driver, battery, and motor.

The master unit can link up with more slave units, which it then drags around behind it.

The reference design for the vehicle is GM and Segway’s Project P.U.M.A.

Chan imagines all sorts of applications for the vehicle: adding on short slave unit containers for smaller loads, large containers for heavier loads, tacking on an extra compartment to carry more people.

It’s also fully electric.

The Segway project it’s based on has a range of 25 to 35 miles and a top speed of 25 to 35 mph. So the Citi.Transmitter would be purely for urban driving.

Alas, it was just a student project. It probably won’t ever come to production.

2013-01-09

Co.Exist

A Two-Wheeled Electric Vehicle To Zip Through City Streets

The Citi.Transmitter is an adorable single seat modular transportation device, designed to solve our urban traffic problems.

When was the last time you saw a two-wheeled electric car on the road? There aren’t many out there yet, but the number could slowly increase as vehicles like Lit Motors C-1 (a mutant half car, half motorcycle set to be released in 2014) and GM’s autonomous EN-V start to roll out.

Vincent Chan, a designer at Body Glove, has his own idea for a single-seater, two-wheeled EV: the Citi.Transmitter, a modular EV with a master unit—containing the driver, battery, and motor—that can be attached to any number of slave units. According to Inhabitat, the reference design for the vehicle is GM and Segway’s Project P.U.M.A, a two-wheeler prototype that has a range of 25 to 35 miles and a top speed of 25 to 35 mph. The Citi.Transmitter is purely for urban driving, in other words.

Chan imagines all sorts of applications for the vehicle: adding on short slave unit containers for smaller loads, large containers for heavier loads, tacking on an extra compartment to carry more people, and even offroading (the vehicle can supposedly travel through gravel, snow, rocks, mud, and other terrain).

There are no plans for release—this was a student project that Chan completed in 2010 at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. But if the designer ever did decide to bring this to production, its small size would probably ensure that it doesn’t cost as much as traditional EVs.

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5 Comments

  • Nicholas Hayhoe

    Love the concept but you are spending extra energy to maintain balance. Why skip a 3rd wheel when it reduces energy loss?

  • Uncle_Fred

    Being a 2 wheel vehicle, C-1 gets 260 KM of range on a single charge (prototype). The size reduction and reduction of surface drag, road drag and its diminutive weight make-up for the inclusion of the gyros.

  • Simon Barnes

    a fascinating idea, but it raises so many practical questions in my mind. It must have some kind of stand to stop it falling over when unpowered, and either have a gyro or a means of tilting itself backwards under heavy braking - which might then compromise forward visibility. Obviously the same applies the other way to acceleration, though presumably to a lesser extent

  • Uncle_Fred

    The C-1 deploys a kickstand when the vehicle is not in use. The gyros operate while in use.