Tata announced this week that it’s planning on bringing the Nano to the U.S.

The U.S. model will be more sophisticated than the Indian version--meaning it will have a larger engine, traction control, and power steering.

The Indian Nano lacks air conditioning (in the base model) and air bags; presumably these features will be available in the new Nano.

The new Nano will be more expensive than the Indian version--it will, however, remain under $10,000.

Its small size and its high gas mileage (56 mpg in the Indian model) make it ideal for city driving.

Tata hasn’t revealed how the car will be distributed. That’s not surprising; the company doesn’t have any sort of distribution network in the U.S. We will find out soon; the Nano is scheduled to arrive within three years.

2012-10-16

Co.Exist

The World's Cheapest Car Is Heading To The U.S.

After failing to take India by storm, the Tata Nano may now make an appearance stateside. It won’t be quite the same stripped-down vehicle (airbags will be included) but it will still be the cheapest car you can buy. Who wants a tiny, sub-$10,000 car?

The Tata Nano should have been a hit. It’s the cheapest car available today. One Indian rating agency thought that the Nano--priced at about $3,500 in India--could have expanded the car market in the country by 65%. That didn’t happen, possibly because the Nano is still more expensive than motorcycles, which are extremely popular in India. Nonetheless, Tata announced this week that it’s planning on bringing the Nano to the U.S.

Details are slim, but Ratan Tata, chairman of the Tata Group, told Automotive News that the U.S. model will be more sophisticated than the Indian version--meaning it will have a larger engine, traction control, and power steering. The Indian Nano lacks air conditioning (in the base model) and air bags; presumably these features will be available in the new Nano. Air bags, of course, have to be included.

Those changes don’t come cheap. The new Nano will be more expensive than the Indian version. It will, however, remain under $10,000, which makes it a bargain by any standard. The vehicle’s small size makes it ideal for city driving, and its high gas mileage (56 mpg for the Indian Nano) should appeal to anyone sick of high gas prices.

Tata hasn’t revealed how the car will be distributed. That’s not surprising; the company doesn’t have any sort of distribution network in the U.S. It’s one of a handful of reasons why Car and Driver doesn’t think the Nano will ever make it stateside. We will find out soon, though--the Nano is scheduled to arrive within three years.

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3 Comments

  • jameskaiser

    I will say after emissions laws come into effect on the Nano we will see that gas mileage drop significantly  Also add on the extra weight for safety features, we'll see that number drop to mid 40s easy. Still if they can make me a sub-10,000 car. I may bite and pick one up. I just can nto justify spending over $20,000 on a car that I spend about an hour a day in.

  • Eric Needle

    The world's cheapest car meets every other vehicle on the American road. It's a physics equation. At least Smart cars went through the exercise of trying not to make coffins with wheels. Sorry to burst bubbles... really wish we had cheap, good, efficient rides. Alas, I would not put my kids in one of these.

  • sreehemanth

    I'd recommend you see the "car" first and then comment on how bad it will really be. Because, it is "not" going to be the same car (even though it is unnecessarily written off).

    There is always a good surprise in the result of hard work, and it will certainly pay off!